SECTION 5

SECTION 5's focus is Next Level Filmed Entertainment. We're committed to pushing viewers beyond conventional story-telling and into a filmed experience using a multi-platform approach. The richness of the tech available to us now is unprecedented; Augmented Reality, touch-screen devices, audience engagement, etc. We are at a moment in Entertainment where all the rules have changed not only in the structure of our business, but in the delivery and architecture of the projects, themselves. SECTION 5 is also committed to pushing the boundaries creatively and exploring the Next Level of writing, directing, acting, cinematography, editing, etc. This is a remarkable pivot point for Filmed Entertainment.

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emergentfutures:

The enterprise technologies to watch in 2014

Full Story: ZDNET

Mar 04
emergentfutures:

The enterprise technologies to watch in 2014
Full Story: ZDNET

prostheticknowledge:

Project Tango

Google unveils next-generation smartphone device featuring motion and depth sensors. This is really exciting as it offers computational photography to the masses and far more sophisticated Augmented Reality experiences. The prototype device is available now for developers to create something special - video embedded below:

As we walk through our daily lives, we use visual cues to navigate and understand the world around us. We observe the size and shape of objects and rooms, and we learn their position and layout almost effortlessly over time. This awareness of space and motion is fundamental to the way we interact with our environment and each other. We are physical beings that live in a 3D world. Yet, our mobile devices assume that physical world ends at the boundaries of the screen.

The goal of Project Tango is to give mobile devices a human-scale understanding of space and motion.

You can find out more at the Project Tango website here

Feb 22

futurescope:

New Camera Stabilizer Could Change Cinematography Forever

Not really future, more likely tomorrow, but add this gimbal to a drone and welcome 1984. Only 15k plus the price of a drone. From Gizmodo:

A new piece of filmmaking gear was just announced that could completely re-invent the complex process of camera stabilization. It’s currently being tested and endorsed by Vincent LaForet, who’s given us a little taste of what it’s capable of.

The product is called MōVI, created by Freefly, longtime maker of crazy camera-drone equipment and stabilizers. LaForet is presenting a short film and behind-the-scenes video to illustrate its abilities, which consists of a completely custom-made gimbal and 3-axis gyroscope that digitally stabilizes the camera (a Canon 1DC in this case). It looks to be very light and portable, a far cry from giant metal arms, vests, and weights that almost the entire camera support world is based on.

Video:

[read more] [Movi]

Jan 03

parislemon:

8bitfuture:

Video: Samsung’s ‘Display Centric World’

A promotional video from Samsung in which their displays can be embedded in almost everything.

Mildly creepy (especially the voice-over). Sort of cool.

Jan 01

futurescope:

UCLA Engineering develops flexible and stretchable LEDs

Imagine an electronic display nearly as clear as a window, or a curtain that illuminates a room, or a smartphone screen that doubles in size, stretching like rubber. Now imagine all of these being made from the same material. Researchers from UCLA’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science have developed a transparent, stretchable, twistable organic light-emitting device that could one day make all these possible. 

[UCLA] [read more @vice & @kurzweilai]

Sep 25

futurescope:

Flexpad: Highly Flexible Bending Interactions for Projected Handheld Displays (CHI 2013)

Flexpad is a highly flexible display interface. It introduces a novel way of interacting with flexible displays by using detailed deformations. Using a Kinect camera and a projector, Flexpad transforms virtually any sheet of paper or foam into a flexible, highly deformable and spatially aware handheld display. It uses a novel approach for tracking deformed surfaces from depth images very robustly, in high detail and in real time. As a result, the display is considerably more deformable than previous work on flexible handheld displays, enabling novel applications that leverage the high expressiveness of detailed deformation. We illustrate these unique capabilities through three application examples: curved cross-cuts in volumetric images, deforming virtual paper characters, and slicing through time in videos.

Publication: Jürgen Steimle, Andreas Jordt, and Pattie Maes. “Flexpad: Highly Flexible Bending Interactions for Projected Handheld Displays”. Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Human Factors in Computing (CHI 2013).

[read more: MPI & MIT] [via KurzweilAI]

Sep 13

moderation:

Scientists ‘freeze’ light for an entire minute

In what could prove to be a major breakthrough in quantum memory storage and information processing, German researchers have frozen the fastest thing in the universe: light. And they did so for a record-breaking one minute.

It sounds weird and it is. The reason for wanting to hold light in its place (aside from the sheer awesomeness of it) is to ensure that it retains its quantum coherence properties (i.e. its information state), thus making it possible to build light-based quantum memory. And the longer that light can be held, the better as far as computation is concerned. Accordingly, it could allow for more secure quantum communications over longer distances.

Needless to say, halting light is not easy — you can’t just put in the freezer. Light is electromagnetic radiation that moves at 300 million meters per second. Over the course of a one minute span, it can travel about 11 million miles (18 million km), or 20 round trips to the moon. So it’s a rather wily and slippery medium, to say the least.

But light can be slowed down and even halted altogether. And in fact, researchers once kept it still for 16 seconds by using cold atoms.

(via Io9)

Jul 28
moderation:


Scientists ‘freeze’ light for an entire minute
—
In what could prove to be a major breakthrough in quantum memory storage and information processing, German researchers have frozen the fastest thing in the universe: light. And they did so for a record-breaking one minute.
It sounds weird and it is. The reason for wanting to hold light in its place (aside from the sheer awesomeness of it) is to ensure that it retains its quantum coherence properties (i.e. its information state), thus making it possible to build light-based quantum memory. And the longer that light can be held, the better as far as computation is concerned. Accordingly, it could allow for more secure quantum communications over longer distances.
Needless to say, halting light is not easy — you can’t just put in the freezer. Light is electromagnetic radiation that moves at 300 million meters per second. Over the course of a one minute span, it can travel about 11 million miles (18 million km), or 20 round trips to the moon. So it’s a rather wily and slippery medium, to say the least.
But light can be slowed down and even halted altogether. And in fact, researchers once kept it still for 16 seconds by using cold atoms.
(via Io9)

futuretechreport:

Flexible Screens

STILL WAITING!!! When are these going to really hit the market folks!

thepiblog:

Samsung gives us a glimpse of the future via a prototype of their flexible OLED screen, which paves the way for everything from foldable phones to tablets that you can roll up like a newspaper. 

Jul 08

SECTION 5

Posted on Tuesday March 4th 2014 at 10:45am. Its tags are listed below.

emergentfutures:

The enterprise technologies to watch in 2014
Full Story: ZDNET
emergentfutures:

The enterprise technologies to watch in 2014
Full Story: ZDNET

emergentfutures:

The enterprise technologies to watch in 2014

Full Story: ZDNET

prostheticknowledge:

Project Tango

Google unveils next-generation smartphone device featuring motion and depth sensors. This is really exciting as it offers computational photography to the masses and far more sophisticated Augmented Reality experiences. The prototype device is available now for developers to create something special - video embedded below:

As we walk through our daily lives, we use visual cues to navigate and understand the world around us. We observe the size and shape of objects and rooms, and we learn their position and layout almost effortlessly over time. This awareness of space and motion is fundamental to the way we interact with our environment and each other. We are physical beings that live in a 3D world. Yet, our mobile devices assume that physical world ends at the boundaries of the screen.

The goal of Project Tango is to give mobile devices a human-scale understanding of space and motion.

You can find out more at the Project Tango website here

futurescope:

New Camera Stabilizer Could Change Cinematography Forever

Not really future, more likely tomorrow, but add this gimbal to a drone and welcome 1984. Only 15k plus the price of a drone. From Gizmodo:

A new piece of filmmaking gear was just announced that could completely re-invent the complex process of camera stabilization. It’s currently being tested and endorsed by Vincent LaForet, who’s given us a little taste of what it’s capable of.

The product is called MōVI, created by Freefly, longtime maker of crazy camera-drone equipment and stabilizers. LaForet is presenting a short film and behind-the-scenes video to illustrate its abilities, which consists of a completely custom-made gimbal and 3-axis gyroscope that digitally stabilizes the camera (a Canon 1DC in this case). It looks to be very light and portable, a far cry from giant metal arms, vests, and weights that almost the entire camera support world is based on.

Video:

[read more] [Movi]

SECTION 5

Posted on Wednesday January 1st 2014 at 01:56pm. Its tags are listed below.

parislemon:

8bitfuture:

Video: Samsung’s ‘Display Centric World’

A promotional video from Samsung in which their displays can be embedded in almost everything.

Mildly creepy (especially the voice-over). Sort of cool.

futurescope:

UCLA Engineering develops flexible and stretchable LEDs

Imagine an electronic display nearly as clear as a window, or a curtain that illuminates a room, or a smartphone screen that doubles in size, stretching like rubber. Now imagine all of these being made from the same material. Researchers from UCLA’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science have developed a transparent, stretchable, twistable organic light-emitting device that could one day make all these possible. 

[UCLA] [read more @vice & @kurzweilai]

SECTION 5

Posted on Friday September 13th 2013 at 06:32am. Its tags are listed below.

futurescope:

Flexpad: Highly Flexible Bending Interactions for Projected Handheld Displays (CHI 2013)

Flexpad is a highly flexible display interface. It introduces a novel way of interacting with flexible displays by using detailed deformations. Using a Kinect camera and a projector, Flexpad transforms virtually any sheet of paper or foam into a flexible, highly deformable and spatially aware handheld display. It uses a novel approach for tracking deformed surfaces from depth images very robustly, in high detail and in real time. As a result, the display is considerably more deformable than previous work on flexible handheld displays, enabling novel applications that leverage the high expressiveness of detailed deformation. We illustrate these unique capabilities through three application examples: curved cross-cuts in volumetric images, deforming virtual paper characters, and slicing through time in videos.

Publication: Jürgen Steimle, Andreas Jordt, and Pattie Maes. “Flexpad: Highly Flexible Bending Interactions for Projected Handheld Displays”. Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Human Factors in Computing (CHI 2013).

[read more: MPI & MIT] [via KurzweilAI]

Justine Bateman is Going Back to School to Upend Hollywood

SECTION 5

Posted on Sunday July 28th 2013 at 03:49pm. Its tags are listed below.

moderation:


Scientists ‘freeze’ light for an entire minute
—
In what could prove to be a major breakthrough in quantum memory storage and information processing, German researchers have frozen the fastest thing in the universe: light. And they did so for a record-breaking one minute.
It sounds weird and it is. The reason for wanting to hold light in its place (aside from the sheer awesomeness of it) is to ensure that it retains its quantum coherence properties (i.e. its information state), thus making it possible to build light-based quantum memory. And the longer that light can be held, the better as far as computation is concerned. Accordingly, it could allow for more secure quantum communications over longer distances.
Needless to say, halting light is not easy — you can’t just put in the freezer. Light is electromagnetic radiation that moves at 300 million meters per second. Over the course of a one minute span, it can travel about 11 million miles (18 million km), or 20 round trips to the moon. So it’s a rather wily and slippery medium, to say the least.
But light can be slowed down and even halted altogether. And in fact, researchers once kept it still for 16 seconds by using cold atoms.
(via Io9)
moderation:


Scientists ‘freeze’ light for an entire minute
—
In what could prove to be a major breakthrough in quantum memory storage and information processing, German researchers have frozen the fastest thing in the universe: light. And they did so for a record-breaking one minute.
It sounds weird and it is. The reason for wanting to hold light in its place (aside from the sheer awesomeness of it) is to ensure that it retains its quantum coherence properties (i.e. its information state), thus making it possible to build light-based quantum memory. And the longer that light can be held, the better as far as computation is concerned. Accordingly, it could allow for more secure quantum communications over longer distances.
Needless to say, halting light is not easy — you can’t just put in the freezer. Light is electromagnetic radiation that moves at 300 million meters per second. Over the course of a one minute span, it can travel about 11 million miles (18 million km), or 20 round trips to the moon. So it’s a rather wily and slippery medium, to say the least.
But light can be slowed down and even halted altogether. And in fact, researchers once kept it still for 16 seconds by using cold atoms.
(via Io9)

moderation:

Scientists ‘freeze’ light for an entire minute

In what could prove to be a major breakthrough in quantum memory storage and information processing, German researchers have frozen the fastest thing in the universe: light. And they did so for a record-breaking one minute.

It sounds weird and it is. The reason for wanting to hold light in its place (aside from the sheer awesomeness of it) is to ensure that it retains its quantum coherence properties (i.e. its information state), thus making it possible to build light-based quantum memory. And the longer that light can be held, the better as far as computation is concerned. Accordingly, it could allow for more secure quantum communications over longer distances.

Needless to say, halting light is not easy — you can’t just put in the freezer. Light is electromagnetic radiation that moves at 300 million meters per second. Over the course of a one minute span, it can travel about 11 million miles (18 million km), or 20 round trips to the moon. So it’s a rather wily and slippery medium, to say the least.

But light can be slowed down and even halted altogether. And in fact, researchers once kept it still for 16 seconds by using cold atoms.

(via Io9)

SECTION 5

Posted on Monday July 8th 2013 at 06:19am. Its tags are listed below.

futuretechreport:

Flexible Screens

STILL WAITING!!! When are these going to really hit the market folks!

thepiblog:

Samsung gives us a glimpse of the future via a prototype of their flexible OLED screen, which paves the way for everything from foldable phones to tablets that you can roll up like a newspaper.